What is Lintel or Lintol? Types of Lintel and Uses in Building

What is Lintel or Lintol? Types of Lintel and Uses in Building – A lintel is a horizontal structural block that connects two vertical supports and spans the space or opening between them. It can be a single ornamented structural item or a combined ornamented architectural element.

It’s common to see it on portals, doors, and windows. The bottom span of a window is referred to as a sill instead of a lintel, but unlike a lintel, it does not bear a load to ensure the wall’s integrity.

What Is a Lintel ?

A lintel, also known as a lintol, is a beam that spans openings like portals, doors, windows, and fireplaces. It can be a single ornamented structural item or a combined ornamented architectural element.

Lintels are also known as beams in beam and block slabs or ribs in rib and block slabs and are made of prestressed concrete.

These prestressed concrete lintels and blocks are parts of a suspended floor concrete slab that are packed together and propped.

Types of Lintel used in Building Construction

Lintels are classified as follows based on the material used in their construction:

  1. Brick Lintel
  2. Reinforced Brick Lintel
  3. Reinforced Cement Concrete Lintel
  4. Steel Lintel
  5. Stone Lintel
  6. Timber Lintel

Brick Lintel

When the opening is less than 1m and the loads are less, a brick lintel is used. Depending on the span, the depth ranges from 10 to 20 cm. Bricks with frogs are better than regular bricks because the frogs, when filled with mortar, give the end joints more shear resistance, resulting in a joggled brick lintel.

Reinforced Brick Lintel

When loads are heavy and the span is greater than 1m, Reinforced Brick Lintels are used. The reinforced brick lintel should be 10 cm, 15 cm, or a multiple of 10 cm deep.

The bricks are arranged in such a way that a 2 to 3 cm wide space is left between adjacent bricks lengthwise for the insertion of mild steel reinforcement bars. The gaps are filled with a 1:3 cement mortar.

Every third vertical joint is equipped with 6 mm diameter vertical stirrups. The main reinforcement at the bottom is made up of 8 to 10 mm diameter bars that are cranked up at the ends.

Reinforced Cement Concrete Lintel

Because of their strength, rigidity, fire resistance, economy, and ease of construction, reinforced concrete lintels are now widely used to span the openings for doors, windows, and other openings in a structure. These are appropriate for all loads and spans. The width is the same as the wall’s width, and the depth is determined by the length of the span and the magnitude of the load.

Half of these bars are cranked at the ends, and the main reinforcement is provided at the bottom. To resist transverse shear, shear stirrups are provided.

Steel Lintel

When the superimposed loads are heavy and the openings are large, steel lintels are used. These are made up of rolled steel joists or channel sections. Depending on the situation, we can use a single section or a combination of sections.

The steel joist is either embedded in concrete or clad with stone facing when used alone to keep the width of the wall the same. Tube separators keep multiple units in place when they are placed next to each other.

Stone Lintel

Stone Lintels are the most common, especially in areas where stone is abundant. The thickness of these is the most important design feature. These are also available for use over brick wall openings. A single piece of stone lintel or multiple pieces of stone lintel are available.

This type’s depth is kept constant at 10 cm per metre of span, with a minimum of 15 cm. They’re used up to 2 metre spans. Because of its weak tensile nature, cracks form in the stone lintel when the structure is subjected to vibratory loads. As a result, caution is required.

Timber Lintel

Timber lintels were commonly used in construction in the past. However, they have been replaced by several modern techniques in recent years; however, they are still used in hilly areas. The main disadvantages of timber are its higher cost, lower durability, and vulnerability to fire.

If the length of the opening is greater, it is created by joining a number of wooden pieces together with steel bolts, as shown in fig (a). It is made up of two wooden pieces kept at a distance by packing pieces made of wood in the case of wider walls. Flitched lintels are strengthened by the addition of mild steel plates to the top and bottom of the lintels.

Lintel FAQs

What is a lintel?

The load from the structure above is supported by a lintel, which is a beam placed across openings such as doors, windows, and other openings in buildings. The lintel beam’s width is equal to the wall’s width, and its ends are built into the wall.

What is a steel lintel?

When the superimposed loads are heavy and the openings are large, steel lintels are used. These are made up of rolled steel joists or channel sections. Depending on the situation, we can use a single section or a combination of sections.
The steel joist is either embedded in concrete or clad with stone facing when used alone to keep the width of the wall the same. Tube separators keep multiple units in place when they are placed next to each other.

what does lintel mean?

A lintel is a horizontal structural block that spans the space or opening between two vertical supports.

what is a door lintel?

A lintel, which is a beam placed across openings such as doors, supports the load from the structure above.

what is a lintel used for?

A lintel is a horizontal structural block that connects two vertical supports and spans the space or opening between them.